Parallel Extensions CTP released
3 December 2007 in .Net, Code, Microsoft, Tools | Comments enabled

Just an FYI for anyone that is keeping up parallel computing, Microsoft has released the December CTP of the Parallel Extensions Library.

From my work with it I’ve found it to generally be quite usable however the documentation and general install quality is a little weak at the moment. Even when trying to respond via the email link in the documentation with some suggested documentation changes I found the email was bounced back – not an overly good look but it is early days :)

The extensions provide parallelisation helpers for both general tasks (e.g. making a for loop parallel) as well as providing PLINQ (one quess for what the “P” stands for!). PLINQ, from my reading, applies only to LINQ to Objects but is a useful start. So far my interest has been in the tasks support.

As a simple example of how to make a loop run using all your cores, here is our original code:

foreach(MyClass c in data)
{
  DoHardStuff(c);
}

Here is our code using the Parallel Extensions:

Parallel.ForEach(data, delegate(MyClass c)
{
   DoHardStuff(c);
});

As you can see, the extensions make it easy enough to start getting some elementary parallelism working.

The tide is changing

I haven’t heard developers discussing parallelism all that much yet and that concerns me slightly given the impending dependence on parallelisation that high performance software solutions are going to have in the coming years. I wonder if perhaps this is because Microsoft hasn’t released anything specific about it yet (present post topic excluded) and therefore many in the .NET space simply have ignored the parallelisation issues. Certainly some developers are looking at languages such as Erlang which is designed with parallel development in mind and enables the creation of massively parallel software.

A key thing to remember is that parallisation is not a solved problem. Simply dropping in a Microsoft assembly is not going to mean that your solutions are going to run a lot better all the time, hence my advice that developers everywhere should be sharpening their saw and rediscovering exactly what the long bearded lecturer in their computer science concurrency class was babbling about.

I would urge every developer to, at the very least, do some reading up on threading, concurrency and even perhaps try the Parallel Extensions.

– JD


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